How to Save Yourself from Spamming?

It has been a hot and humid day. The power line to your house tripped around noon. Every second a sweat drop drips down your right temple. But more than this, two phone calls have irritated you since morning. A coaching institution asking you whether you would like to join their class. Or some unknown college making a sweet call to inform that their seats are filling fast. You starting counting your sins. What did you do wrong?

Your phone number and mail address are the two credentials that you should stop giving out. Freshers are very generous with sharing these details. By the time students realise their mistake, it is too late. Go to your SMS or mail inbox, you’ll find countless messages/mails regarding admissions, coaching classes, etc. While you can mark emails as spam or block/unsubscribe them, the messages and cold calls can still make your life miserable. If you don’t believe this happens, ask someone who has completed his graduation.

College societies always finish first in the race of selling the data of the college students. They need money for sponsorship. Consequently, your contact information gets traded as a commodity. It doesn’t stop here. When the author used the reference of commodity, he meant it. Contact details are further traded by coaching institutions. For instance, a coaching institution selling the data to a private-MBA college after it has utilized it completely. Thus, your contact details are forwarded like a viral video.

Unless it is important, opt-out of providing your true contact number. Maintain two mail accounts. You can use your secondary mail for signing up for any offers, college, events, new websites/apps, suspicious services, etc. College societies usually roll out a pan-department form asking all students to fill it. Try to avoid being helpful here. Doing all this may not make you completely immune to cold calls, messages, or emails. But your digital life will be less annoying if you become a little vigilant.

--

--

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store